Internazionale

Formed1908
GroundStadio Giuseppe Meazza
Capacity75923
AddressItaly, Milan, Via Piccolomini, 5, 20151
Ground Info San Siro, officially known as Stadio Giuseppe Meazza, is a football stadium in the San Siro district of Milan, Italy, which is the home of A.C. Milan and Internazionale. It has a seating capacity of 80,018, making it one of the largest stadiums in Europe, and the largest in Italy. On 3 March 1980, the stadium was named in honour of Giuseppe Meazza, the two-time World Cup winner (1934, 1938) who played for Inter and briefly for Milan in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s and served two stints as Inter's manager. San Siro is a UEFA category four stadium. It hosted three games at the 1934 FIFA World Cup, six games at the 1990 FIFA World Cup, three games at the UEFA Euro 1980, and four European Cup finals, in 1965, 1970, 2001 and 2016. The stadium will also host the opening ceremony of the 2026 Winter Olympics of Milan and Cortina d'Ampezzo. Construction of the stadium commenced in 1925 in the district of Milan named San Siro, with the new stadium originally named Nuovo Stadio Calcistico San Siro (San Siro New Football Stadium). The idea to build a stadium in the same district as the horse racing track belonged to the president of A.C. Milan at the time, Piero Pirelli. The architects designed a private stadium only for football, without athletics tracks which characterized Italian stadiums built with public funds. The inauguration was on 19 September 1926, when 35,000 spectators saw Inter defeat Milan 6–3. Originally, the ground was home and property of A.C. Milan. Finally, in 1947, Inter, who used to play in the Arena Civica downtown, became tenants and the two have shared the ground ever since. From 1948 to 1955, engineers Armando Ronca and Ferruccio Calzolari developed the project for the second extension of the stadium, which was meant to increase the capacity from 50,000 to 150,000 visitors. Calzolari and Ronca proposed three additional, vertically arranged, rings of spectator rows. Nineteen spiralling ramps – each 200 metres long – gave access to the upper tiers. During construction, the realisation of the highest of the three rings was abandoned and the number of visitors limited to 100,000. Then for security reasons, the capacity was reduced to 60,000 seats and 25,000 standing. On 2 March 1980 the stadium was named for Giuseppe Meazza (1910–1979), one of the most famous Milanese footballers. For a time, Inter fans called the stadium Stadio Meazza due to Meazza's stronger connections with Inter (14 years as a player, three stints as manager). However, in recent years both Inter and Milan fans have called the stadium simply San Siro. The last major renovation for San Siro, which cost $60 million, was that of 1987-1990, for the 1990 FIFA World Cup. It was decided to modernize the stadium by increasing its capacity to 85,000 spectators and building a cover. The Municipality of Milan entrusted the work to the architects Giancarlo Ragazzi and Enrico Hoffer and to the engineer Leo Finzi. To increase capacity, a third ring was built (only in the two curves and in the west grandstand) which rests on eleven support towers surrounded by helical ramps that allow access to the public. Four of these eleven concrete towers were located at the corners to support a new roof, which has distinctive protruding red girders. In 1996 a museum was opened inside the stadium charting A. C. Milan and Inter's story, with historical shirts, cups and trophies, shoes, art objects and souvenirs of all kinds on display to visitors. Two Milan derby Champions League knockout ties have taken place at San Siro, in 2003 and 2005, with A.C. Milan winning both ties. The reaction of Inter's fans to impending defeat in the 2005 match (throwing flares and other objects at Milan players and forcing the match to be abandoned) earned the club a large fine and a four-game ban on spectators attending European fixtures there the following season. Apart from being used by Milan and Inter, the Italian national team occasionally plays games there. It has also been used for the European Cup finals of 1965 (won by Inter), 1970 (won by Feyenoord), and the UEFA Champions League finals of 2001 (won by FC Bayern Munich) and 2016 (won by Real Madrid). The stadium was also used for the home leg of three UEFA Cup finals in which Inter was competing (1991, 1994, 1997) when these were played over two legs. It was also used by Juventus for their 'home' leg in 1995 as they decided against playing their biggest matches at their own Stadio delle Alpi at the time. On each occasion, apart from 1991, the second leg was played at San Siro and the winners lifted the trophy there. However, the stadium has not yet been selected as the host stadium since the competition changed to a single-match final format in 1997–98. San Siro has never hosted a final of the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, but was the host stadium for the 1951 Latin Cup, a four-team event won by A.C. Milan. The city was also the venue for the 1956 edition of the Latin Cup (also won by Milan), but those matches were played at Arena Civica. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy, on 25 March, the Associated Press dubbed the UEFA Champions League match between Bergamo club Atalanta B.C. and Spanish club Valencia at San Siro on 19 February as "Game Zero". The match was the first time Atalanta has progressed to a Champions League round of 16 match, and had an attendance of over 40,000 people—about one third of Bergamo's population. By 24 March, almost 7,000 people in the province of Bergamo had tested positive for COVID-19, and more than 1,000 people had died from the virus—making Bergamo the most hard-hit province in all of Italy during the pandemic.
HonoursFootball Club Internazionale Milano, commonly known as simply Inter, is an Italian professional football club based in Milan, Lombardy.
nter is the only Italian club never to have been relegated from the top flight of Italian football.

Founded in 1908 following a schism within the Milan Cricket and Football Club (now A.C. Milan), Inter won its first championship in 1910. Since its formation, the club has won 31 domestic trophies, including 19 league titles, 7 Coppa Italia and 5 Supercoppa Italiana. From 2006 to 2010, the club won five successive league titles, equalling the all-time record at that time. They have won the Champions League three times: two back-to-back in 1964 and 1965 and then another in 2010. Their latest win completed an unprecedented Italian seasonal treble, with Inter winning the Coppa Italia and the Scudetto the same year. The club has also won three UEFA Cups, two Intercontinental Cups and one FIFA Club World Cup.

Inter's home games are played at the San Siro stadium, which they share with city rivals A.C. Milan. The stadium is the largest in Italian football with a capacity of 75,923. They have long-standing rivalries with A.C. Milan, with whom they contest the Derby della Madonnina, and Juventus, with whom they contest the Derby d'Italia; their rivalry with the former is one of the most followed derbies in football. As of 2019, Inter has the highest home game attendance in Italy and the sixth highest attendance in Europe. The club is one of the most valuable in Italian and world football.
Honours:
Inter have won 31 domestic trophies, including the league 19 times, the Coppa Italia seven and the Supercoppa Italiana five. From 2006 to 2010, the club won five successive league titles, equalling the all-time record before 2017, when Juventus won the sixth successive league title. They have won the Champions League three times: two back-to-back in 1964 and 1965 and then another in 2010; the last completed an unprecedented Italian treble with the Coppa Italia and the Scudetto.[12] The club has also won three UEFA Cups, two Intercontinental Cups and one FIFA Club World Cup.

Inter has never been relegated from the top flight of Italian football in its entire existence. It is the sole club to have competed in Serie A and its predecessors in every season. The Nerrazurri currently have the longest unbroken run in the top flight leagues of any club on the Continent, 106 seasons, and among European clubs, only five British clubs have longer current spells in the top flight.
Domestic:
Seria A - 19 times;
Coppa Italia - 7;
Supercoppa Italiana - 5.

Continental:
European Cup / UEFA Champions League - 3;
UEFA Cup - 3.

Worldwide:
Intercontinental Cup - 2;
FIFA Club World Cup - 1.
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Internazionale Players List

  Name PositionAgeHeight
1 Samir Handanovic Goalkeeper 36 193cm
2 Achraf Hakimi Midfielder 22 181cm
5 Roberto Gagliardini Midfielder 27 188cm
6 Stefan de Vrij Defender 29 189cm
7 Alexis Sánchez Forward 32 168cm
8 Matías Vecino Midfielder 29 187cm
9 Romelu Lukaku Forward 28 191cm
10 Lautaro Martínez Forward 23 174cm
11 Aleksandar Kolarov Defender 35 187cm
12 Stefano Sensi Midfielder 25 168cm
13 Andrea Ranocchia Defender 33 195cm
14 Ivan Perisic Midfielder 32 186cm
15 Ashley Young Midfielder 35 175cm
22 Arturo Vidal Midfielder 34 180cm
23 Nicolò Barella Midfielder 24 172cm
24 Christian Eriksen Midfielder 29 182cm
27 Daniele Padelli Goalkeeper 35 191cm
33 Danilo D’Ambrosio Defender 32 180cm
35 Filip Stankovic Goalkeeper 19 187cm
36 Matteo Darmian Defender 31 183cm
37 Milan Skriniar Defender 26 188cm
77 Marcelo Brozovic Midfielder 28 181cm
95 Alessandro Bastoni Defender 22 190cm
97 Ionut Radu Goalkeeper 24 188cm
99 Andrea Pinamonti Forward 22 185cm

Matches